Garden Talk (2022): What is in my Flower Garden This Year

We have a lot of catching up to do. I had been so busy this year that I did not realize that I haven’t shared a single post about my garden this year. It is not that I am not doing any gardening, just busy with a lot of things at work and with my personal life. We are going to have a long chat today, I will be sharing you the blooms in my garden this year. This year is the year that I dedicated myself to planting and growing more flowers in my garden. A lot of my flowers are ornamental (not edible) but they gave me so much joy. I cannot eat them, but they feed my soul with happiness every time I look at them. My main goal for planting more flowers this year is so that I can use it as props fro my blog and to decorate my place with freshly cut flowers all Summer long. I am happy to report that I had accomplished my goal, I cannot be more happier with the result. I will definitely continue doing this again next year and in more years to come. Seeing the beautiful blooms inspired me to plant more and experiment more. So let me show you what I had been up to this year in my flower garden. Where do I begin?

Before we go any further, let us first touch on the difference between annual, biennial and perennial when it comes to plants. This could apply to both flowers and vegetables. Knowing the difference will help you decide when you are selecting what to plant.

What is the difference between Annual, Biennial & Perennial

  • Annual – Plants that perform their entire life cycle from seed to flower within a single growing season. All roots, stems and leaves of the plant die annually which means you need to start all over again and replant it if you want to grow it the following year.
  • Biennial – Plants which require two years to complete their life cycle. First season growth results in a small rosette of leaves near the soil surface. During the second season’s growth stem elongation, flowering and seed formation occur followed by the entire plant’s death.
  • Perennial – Plants that persist for many growing seasons. Generally the top portion of the plant dies back each winter and regrows the following spring from the same root system. When starting perennial plants from seed (like Shasta Daisy or Coneflower) blooms will happen either in early Spring or Summer of the following year and each year thereafter.
  • Annual/Perennial – A plant can behave as an annual or a perennial depending on local climatic and geographic growing conditions.

Welcome to My Garden

Let me show you what flowers I had for Spring and what is currently in bloom. I was meaning to do a a separate Spring and Summer garden talk post but I got really busy so I am combining them into 1 post. I am only sharing the one that I started on my one and leaving out the ones that I bought from the nursery. We can probably have a separate post for that, hopefully 🙂 Let me show you around and start our flower tour.

Lupin

I started planting Lupin from seeds last year and got few blooms but not as much as this year. This year, they grew like crazy and people cannot helped to stopped by and admire them. The elongated flowers spiky flower will surely catch anyones attention.

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size: 3–4 ft. tall, 1–1.5 ft. wide
  • Sun Exposure: Full
  • Bloom Time: Spring, Summer
  • Hardiness Zones: 4–8 (USDA)

These are the ones that first came out during Spring, even before the Tulips and Daffodils. They add nice height to my cut flower arrangement. I was surprised how fast they grow, especially the foliage. They are quite easy to propagate just by letting the seeds dry and collecting them. I’ve given away a lot of seeds from what I saved last year. As beautiful as they are, they consumed a lot of space in my garden.

They come in different colors btu the one that I had was a shade of light and dark purple and a light pink. I was hoping to get the yellow and orange one too but no luck with that. The packets comes with a LOT of seeds and you will never really know what color they will be until they bloom. It was an assorted pack but it seems the pack I got only have 3 colors. But still, they are beautiful. They are almost like wild flowers. I saw a lot of this in Garry Point Park close to Steveston Village where I often go for a walk during the weekend. That is also where I buy my seedlings, both vegetables and flowers.

Shasta Daisy

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size: 9 in.-3 ft. tall, 1-2 ft. wide
  • Sun Exposure: Full, partial
  • Bloom Time: Spring, Summer
  • Hardiness Zones: 5–9 (USDA)

I am head over heels in love with this flower. They are so beatiful and makes a great cut flowers. A perennial flower that is really worth the effort of growing from seeds.

Shasta Daisy is one of my absolute favorite among the many flowers I have in my garden. I also started this in seeds and planted them last year. They did not bear flowers on the first year, probably 3 flowers only but this year, it was very much abundant! It started flowering during Spring time and still flowering up to now. They have already grown taller than me, more than 5 feet.

I noticed that the late blooming flowers, the one that opens up during Summer have a bigger flower. I love the bright yellow center and the bright white color of the petals. I used this a lot as cut flowers, this alone provided me a never ending supply of cut flowers for my home. Love them!

Sweet William

  • Type: Biennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size: 1-2 ft. tall, 0.5-1 ft. wide
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun, part shade
  • Bloom Time: Late Spring, Summer
  • Hardiness Zones: 4a-9b (USDA)

This took awhile to bloom but it was worth the wait. This is a biennial flower so the blooms starts shwoing up the second year of ealy Spring. There are several reasons why I love Sweet William, the first one is their beautiful flowers. They come in different colors, light pink, fuchia, white, maroon and a mix or red and white. The flowers are in small clusters and bundles.

The second reason why I love this, they are great for cut flowers too. I like pnating flowers that are great fro cutting because my main purpose of growing them is so I can use it as decorations for my home. Not only that they are beautiful for cut flowers, but they last a long time before they start to wilt. They look stunning when bundles together in a bunch. I`ve harvested quite a lot of it for my flower arrangements and up to know I still have few flowers left. I will definitely grow this again next year. In fact, I just planted a seed few weeks ago.

This here is a freshly cut flowers. I usually cut them during morning. This is a combination of Sweet William and Lupin. They pair well, tall spiky Lupin and nice bundle of Sweet William. The height of the Lupin complements the volume of Sweet William.

Nasturtium

  • Type: Annual, Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size: 1-10 ft. tall, 1-3 ft. wide
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: Spring, summer, fall
  • Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

This is my second year planting Nasturtium. I love how easy it is to grow and so I decided to grow them again this year. This is the only fully edible flower that Ihave. It says that the leaves, flowers and even seeds are all edible. You can add the flowers and leaves in the salad and you can pickle the seeds, almost like Capers. So yo are probably wondering how does it taste? Well, unfortunately I haven`t tried it. For some reason, eventhough it is confirmed to be edible, I just cannot bring myself to eat them. So if you have tried eating them, let me know how they taste and if you like it or not.

Rose

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size: 1-10 ft. tall, 1-3 ft. wide
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: Spring, summer, fall
  • Hardiness Zones: 9 – 11 (USDA)

This is my first time growing Roses. I have to point out though that I did not start this from scratch or by propagation. I bought all of these from the nursery. The mini Roses are so adorable I cannot helped buying more than what I should. I was supposed to buy only 3 and ended up getting 6.

Now this ones here below are not mini Roses. I got 3 pots of these as I want to use the flowers for the arrangement. They bloomed but not a lot enough for me to cut them for my arrangement so I left them as is. I am hoping that next year I will have enough flowers to cut.

Gladiolus

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size: 2-5 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: June through frost
  • Hardiness Zones: 7 – 10 (USDA)

Gladiolus is definitely a nice flower to have in the garden. It grows tall and easily stands out among the other flowers. I planted this from bulbs and sow them 2 weeks apart so that I will have a continuous bloom all through out the Summer. Half of them already bloomed and there are more coming soon. I bought an assorted pack and so far I can see a yellow and pink blooms already. They also make great cut flowers because they are long and tall but this requires a taller deeper vase so that it doesn’t fall down. I had them scattered all over the edge of garden instead of having them in one area. Although if you want a more focus effect, plant them in groups of 6. The most that I plant in group is by 3’s.

Dahlia

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size: 1-6 ft. tall, and 1-3 ft. wide
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Hardiness Zones: 8 – 10 (USDA)

I love Dahlia! This is one of the bulb (along with Lily) that I was very excited to see bloom. I planted 7 bulbs across the garden and I planted them in 2 weeks internal just like the Gladiolus. So far, I have 3 that came out that are all blooming now. There was 1 plant that I accidentally damage and never continued growing. Hopefully next year it will grow back. I like how the flowers comes in different color combinations. Some are mostly with with pink, and some have fuchsia and white. Although there are some blooms, I feel that it hasn’t reach its full potential yet especially the ones that are somewhat in the shade. The one the is fully expose to the sun are doing a lot better.

Lily

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size:
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Hardiness Zones: 8 – 10 (USDA)

Lily is another one of my favorite flower. I planted the bulb early Spring and I planted yet it in 2 weeks interval along with Gladiolus and Dahlia. This one seems to be a late bloomer. I can already see a lot of Lily are blooming in the other garden by mine seems to take a lot of time, but it did make it.

Holyhock Rose

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size:
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Hardiness Zones:

I started planting this last year and did not see any bloom in the first year. They look different from a regular Rose, the flowers grow along the stems. They have single petals unlike a default Rose that have multiple layers of petals. This one grows tall as well, almost the same height as the Gladiolus. They will probably look good together as a cut flower. I haven’t use any of it for my flower arrangement because I only have I full plant that bloom. Others are quite small and did not bloom fully. I started few more seeds this year and hoping that this batch will be better. So far, I only have white flowers.

Poppies

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size:
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Hardiness Zones:

This California Poppy is the tall variation and they bear big flowers. They are attractive and will definitely catch people’s attention. I like the combination of red, pink and yellow. They grow tall, and the stems are not quite sturdy so staking helps. I’ve used them for some of my flower arrangement but they do not last long, probably 2-3 days and they start to wither. They also grow like crazy and can easily take up space in the garden.

Cupids Dart

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size:
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Hardiness Zones:

This one I started last year and got few blooms. This year, it was prolific! The flowers are not as big, but they are dainty looking. It does occupy a lot of space in the garden once it started blooming. I haven’t used this in my flower arrangements but they will be a good mix with the other pink and purple flowers.

Sweet Pea

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size:
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Hardiness Zones:

Sweet Pea are lovely flowers to have in the garden. They climb so they need staking or trellis. Some variation have a very nice scent. Some are annuals and some are perennial. I’ve planted a lot of this last year and most of what I have now are the ones from last year. I simply cut them down during fall leaving the root system and they came back this year. If you plant this, make sure to plant it where it has something that to climb on. I planted this along the fence so I don’t have to put extra support or staking.

Delphinium

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size:
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Hardiness Zones: (USDA)

I struggled starting this from seed, it took a long rime to germinate and it grows slow. I panted it last year and did not get a bloom until this year. This one is a blue variation,.

Black Eyed Susan

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size:
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Hardiness Zones: (USDA)

I love this flower, it’s almost like a mini sunflower 🌻. They grow like crazy the following year and succeeding years. I like the vibrant yellow flower and the shiny center. They make great cut flowers too. I like combining this with Daisy and Rudbeckia for a yellow and white theme.

Rudbeckia

  • Type: Perennial
  • When to Plant:
  • Mature Size:
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Hardiness Zones: (USDA)

This one is a real beauty too! It looks similar to Black Eyed Susan except for the orange and brown shade in the center which makes it stand out. This one was from last year, it just came back. This year I planted a lot from seeds but none of them germinated. We had a long and wet season this year and it definitely affected and destroyed some of my plants and veggie.

Black Eyed Susan is another one of my favorite. It looks similar to a Daisy but yellow in color. I love the bright vibrant color of this flower. The center looks like velvet brown. This was a comeback from last year. I got worried that it will not comeback because it trimmed it too low, but it managed to come back. It took awhile before it bloom because it was rebuilding the stems again. They make great cut flowers too.

Sunflower

Garden Talk Posts:

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